Old UT Photos

Discussion in 'In The Stands' started by Dionysus, Jul 28, 2017.

  1. BevoJoe

    BevoJoe 5,000+ Posts

    Kinda looks like the house in the “Citizen Kane” movie.
     
  2. Dionysus

    Dionysus Ok Cool. Hook ’Em! Admin

    Happy Winter Solstice, everyone.

    1926: Watch out! A Model T Ford full of UT coeds who are armed with snowballs.

    1926.jpg
    @JimNicar
     
    • Like Like x 3
  3. Dionysus

    Dionysus Ok Cool. Hook ’Em! Admin

    1927: UT President Harry Benedict made it a personal tradition to send out holiday cards with a poem he’d composed. This one was mailed to UT alumni across the state.

    christmas.jpg
    @JimNicar
     
    • Winner Winner x 1
  4. Dionysus

    Dionysus Ok Cool. Hook ’Em! Admin

    1968: Touchdown Texas! UT defeated rival Texas A&M at the annual Thanksgiving Day contest 35-14, in Austin. Look close - UT students still wrapped the goal posts in orange before the game.

    1968.jpg
    @JimNicar
     
    • Like Like x 4
  5. WorsterMan

    WorsterMan 10,000+ Posts

    1968... ahh, 50 years ago. A lot of changes came that season.

    First season of the the new Wishbone Offense. Memorial Stadium was a grass field then, next season the Horns played on Astroturf. I believe the West side upper deck was started late 1968 and was completed in time for the 1969 season opener vs. Navy.

    In 1968 the Horns finished the season 8-1-1 and pounded Tenn. in the Cotton Bowl 36-13. Bill Bradley started the season at QB and James Street took over in game 3 vs. Tech in the 3rd qtr. and after that game leading the Horns to 20 straight wins.
     
    • Like Like x 3
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2019
  6. SabreHorn

    SabreHorn 5,000+ Posts

    Worster,

    The West side upper deck was completed and opened in 1971. Tech game was first sellout.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. DrRad

    DrRad 100+ Posts

    President Benedict's son, H Y Jr (Benny) was a long time family friend. I regret that we (my wife and I) did not save anything when he moved (Benny) to the country north of Dallas. I remember a set of dishes in white with pictures of Campus buildings on them.

    PS The wife "babysat" for his children when she was growing up, we met at UT and married after I graduated.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Dionysus

    Dionysus Ok Cool. Hook ’Em! Admin

    1931: Before UT’s School of Architecture settled into Goldsmith Hall, it was located in a renovated B Hall, originally UT’s first men’s dorm on the east side of the Forty Acres. The architecture library was on an upper floor.

    1931.jpg
    @JimNicar
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. ViperHorn

    ViperHorn 5,000+ Posts

    Wonder how many students wear ties in the library now?
     
  10. WorsterMan

    WorsterMan 10,000+ Posts

    ... and I wonder how many women in the library actually wear dresses nowadays?
     
  11. Dionysus

    Dionysus Ok Cool. Hook ’Em! Admin

    Or men wearing dresses and women wearing ties

    I ain’t judgin’ now
     
    • Funny Funny x 2
  12. WorsterMan

    WorsterMan 10,000+ Posts

    How about men wearing ear rings and women getting tattoos? Neither were doing those in the 1930's.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  13. Dionysus

    Dionysus Ok Cool. Hook ’Em! Admin

    1969: Gregory Gym and the newly opened annex along Speedway Street — when it was still a street.

    1969.jpg
    @JimNicar
     
    • Like Like x 2
  14. WorsterMan

    WorsterMan 10,000+ Posts

    ^^^^ ahh, nostalgic Gregory Gym. My brother and I never attended a game there but my Dad often talked about attending games there when he was a student in the late '40's.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2019
  15. Dionysus

    Dionysus Ok Cool. Hook ’Em! Admin

    January 1933: Construction of Littlefield Fountain on a cloudy day. The east wing of Old Main is seen upper left; on the far right is the original Law Building, replaced in the 1970s by the Graduate School of Business.

    1931-littlefield.jpg
    @JimNicar
     
    • Like Like x 2
  16. WorsterMan

    WorsterMan 10,000+ Posts

    upload_2019-1-25_9-37-13.png

    A majestic view of the the Admin bldg. & UT tower under construction about 1933.
     
    • Like Like x 4
  17. WorsterMan

    WorsterMan 10,000+ Posts

    upload_2019-1-25_10-8-15.png
     
    • Like Like x 3
  18. Joe Fan

    Joe Fan 10,000+ Posts

    • Like Like x 1
  19. SabreHorn

    SabreHorn 5,000+ Posts

    Joe,

    Pathetic article; no mention of Gordon (the newspaper man) or the Indian Princess?

    Article is obviously written by a fur-in-ner
     
  20. Dionysus

    Dionysus Ok Cool. Hook ’Em! Admin

    Did you know? The Cactus Cafe in UT’s Texas Union was originally the “Chuck Wagon” — an eatery/soda fountain that served three meals a day. A full breakfast combo was 25¢ and a hamburger cost a dime. You can still see the ornate beams of the cowboy-themed ceiling.

    cactus-cafe.jpg
    @JimNicar
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • WTF? WTF? x 1
  21. Horns11

    Horns11 5,000+ Posts

    Someone told me that when the famous locals were playing at Cactus Cafe, it still had the full service counter. I could never picture it but that image kind of brings it to life.
     
  22. WorsterMan

    WorsterMan 10,000+ Posts

    upload_2019-2-11_8-58-1.png

    State capital buidling circa 1892
     
    • Like Like x 2
  23. WorsterMan

    WorsterMan 10,000+ Posts

    upload_2019-2-11_9-15-47.png
     
    • Like Like x 2
  24. Dionysus

    Dionysus Ok Cool. Hook ’Em! Admin

    1905: Still thinking of winter? Here’s a day of icy fun on the UT campus.

    The Texas Toboggan Team

    jimnicar.com/2016/01/05/the-texas-toboggan-team

    toboggan.jpg
    @JimNicar

    Remember THE GREAT FROLIC!

    aas-1905-02-05-toboggan-headline.jpg

    snow-old-main-west-side-view-from-the-womans-building.jpg
    The west side of a snow-covered old Main Building, seen from an upper floor in the Woman’s Building. The large north wing (on the left) housed the University Library on the first floor, and a 1,500 seat auditorium directly above.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2019 at 9:57 PM
  25. Vol Horn 4 Life

    Vol Horn 4 Life 5,000+ Posts

    I love this thread!!
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  26. Chop

    Chop 100+ Posts

    Nice. Brings back good memories.

    I remember seeing many games from the aluminum bleachers they added along the first base/right field line. While those were considered the lousy seats by most, you got to watch the opposing relief pitchers warm up just feet away. The pop of the baseball hitting leather at 90 mph just feet away was like music to my ears.

    Late 80's early 90's there was a frequent ump at the Disch named Jenkins who was really fat and used to get heckled a lot by some fans. Willie Nelson also showed up a lot.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  27. Joe Fan

    Joe Fan 10,000+ Posts

    Guess who had an office at UT?
    hint
    The C is for Charles

    [​IMG]
     
    • Like Like x 2
  28. WorsterMan

    WorsterMan 10,000+ Posts

    Here is one of my favs from more modern times but this photo is now almost 50 years old... Jan. 1, 1970.

    I was there that cold and history making day....

    upload_2019-2-12_12-31-21.png
     
    • Like Like x 4
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2019 at 3:32 PM
  29. WorsterMan

    WorsterMan 10,000+ Posts

    Wow, take a look at the construction of perhaps the first scoredboard with an official sponsor. There was no date on the photo so I'm guessing perhaps: mid - late 1930's.

    upload_2019-2-12_13-7-15.png
     
    • Like Like x 1
  30. blonthang

    blonthang 2,500+ Posts

    Didn't know he guested at UT Austin, but have a personal story about Darwin and my time at UT.

    Was in the master's environmental engineering program at UT, in a course on alternative treatment methods of waste. We had to chose a topic to research, write up, and present to the class as part of the grade. I chose "vermiculture" (it's the use of earthworms to treat soil-based waste).

    I went to the PCL and researched what might be in UT's collection and found that Darwin's last work was on the subject of vermiculture --- perhaps even was the seminal scientific work on the subject. He studied their behavior his entire life. But the book in UT's collection was shelved in the Tower, since it was an old selection.

    I dutifully went over there and was allowed up to --- don't remember the floor --- but remembered I had to climb up a somewhat circular metal staircase to get to these stacks and went through the collection to find this book "The Formation of Vegetable Mould through the Action of Worms, with Observations on their Habits" he had published apparently just one year before his death, around 1881.

    I almost trembled as I opened the book and saw the printing date, 1881, and was amazed at the shape it was in, but convinced it was of the original printing. I don't recall ever knowing if Darwin was at UT, but thought that any number of UT alums of ours, but back in the day of Darwin, would have picked up this book and used it like I was doing in the 1980s.

    I discussed this book with Dr. Armstrong and he had knowledge of Darwin's work and took interest, as well as did Dr. Loehr, who UT had brought down from Cornell as part of the UT Centennial "million dollar chair endowment effort" --- Loehr was a national expert in "land treatment of wastes" which of course included vermiculture, well, Texas is a bit warmer than New York. He also was aware of Darwin's work in this area. At the time Dr. Loehr was also Chairman of EPA's Science Advisory Board and testified with EPA Administrator William Reilly before the Senate on issues such as the Valdez oil spill.

    Ah, the benefits of attending "...a university of the first class..."

    I wonder if C. Darwin himself gave that copy to his fellow faculty while in Austin. Damn.
     
    • Like Like x 2

Share This Page