Protecting our 1st Amendment Rights

Discussion in 'West Mall' started by Phil Elliott, May 22, 2020.

  1. theiioftx

    theiioftx 2,500+ Posts

    Preach it brother.
     
  2. Chop

    Chop 2,500+ Posts

    Potential reform coming out of all this:

    Look for a push to change in the churches that use one cup for the wine and everybody's spitty mouth touches it. Some congregations may upset tradition and go with the many little bitty individual cups, or have people just dip the bread in the wine so nobody's mouth touches the cup.

    This will cause great consternation and uproar among some hard-core traditionalists in the one-cup churches. Could even cause some mini-schisms if people don't keep their eyes on the big picture.
     
  3. Monahorns

    Monahorns 2,500+ Posts

    We already dip, but will probably go to individual cups for a while.

    I grew up with individual thimble sized cups. It's all the same to me.
     
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  4. Mr. Deez

    Mr. Deez 10,000+ Posts

    I always thought the one cup thing was silly. I also think the grape juice thing is silly.
     
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  5. Mr. Deez

    Mr. Deez 10,000+ Posts

    Churches over here opened a few weeks ago but have to follow guidelines. Everyone has to wear a mask. Distancing is required. Singing isn't allowed. Attenders have to be recorded.
     
  6. Austin_Bill

    Austin_Bill 2,500+ Posts

    I'm almost there, but his buffoonery is some of the best comedy on the net. He also keeps me up to date on the clown show that is the left.
     
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  7. mchammer

    mchammer 5,000+ Posts

    I saw a reference to a German church recently causing an outbreak because they didn’t follow the rules?
     
  8. Chop

    Chop 2,500+ Posts

    Yep. The grape juice instead of actual (fermented) wine, and prohibition in general, came out of the nativist and womens' rights movements in the late 1800s. As far as I know, prohibition was foreign to Christianity before that time. The idea that a good Christian shouldn't consume any alcohol (not just refrain from getting drunk) would have sounded absurd to just about any preacher, cleric, parishioner, church lady, etc. before around the late 1800s or so. It would have sounded absurd to the 12 Apostles. It sounds a bit absurd to me here in 2020 for that matter...

    Paraphrase only--'I came eating (meat) and drinking (wine) and they called me a glutton and a drunkard.' Sounds like whomever said that (or something like that) drank some alcohol, at least on occasion.

    On edit--here it is, from The Gospel according to St. Matthew, Chapter 11:

    "For John came neither eating nor drinking, and they say, He hath a devil. The Son of man came eating and drinking, and they say, Behold a man gluttonous, and a winebibber, a friend of publicans and sinners. But wisdom is justified of her children."

    Def'n of "winebibber" from Dictionary.com--a person who drinks much wine. Just goes to show that nothing will satisfy some people... They'll rake you over the coals no matter what you do.
     
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    Last edited: May 24, 2020
  9. Mr. Deez

    Mr. Deez 10,000+ Posts

    They claim they were following the rules. Not sure what the truth is.
     
  10. Mr. Deez

    Mr. Deez 10,000+ Posts

    If someone chooses not to drink, that's fine. It's certainly not a requirement. However, I don't see how someone can claim the divinity of Christ and say that alcohol consumption is inherently sinful. Jesus was certainly a drinker. And let's remember that in his first miracle, he provided wine to people who had already been drinking and surely had at least some buzz going.

    Over here, there is pretty much no connection between Christianity and avoiding booze. Some of the best beer in Europe is made by clergy in monasteries. They also make wines and liquors.
     
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  11. Phil Elliott

    Phil Elliott 2,500+ Posts

    Depends on which day we are talking about as to what the rules were. They do tend to change from day to day.
     
  12. Mr. Deez

    Mr. Deez 10,000+ Posts

    Over here, things have been more structured and easier to follow. Changes aren't coming everyday. When changes come at the federal level, Merkel typically makes a national address and explains them. It's a big deal. There is a fair amount of discretion at the state levels, so they make rules as well. They're usually announced by the state minister-president (sorta like governors or prime ministers at the state level). It's also worth noting that the media here is a lot less sloppy. They aren't out to ruin Merkel or the state minister-presidents, so they actually do their jobs. They make changes known to the public and explain them pretty well. I don't even speak German beyond the basics, but I still have a pretty good idea of what the rules are.

    Remember who we're talking about. Germans are militant about knowing what the rules are and following them, which can be good or bad. They don't wing it. If they don't know the rules on something, they'll freak out until they know what they are.

    My guess is that the church knew the rules and probably was following them but that one or two members blew them off or just got a little sloppy.
     
  13. Sangre Naranjada

    Sangre Naranjada Winebibber

    Thanks. Gave me a new title.
     
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  14. Horns11

    Horns11 5,000+ Posts

    I can't speak for other denominations, but Welch (the Methodist) invented the juice during the height of the temperance movement. Methodists have since altered their stance on why it's grape juice to be more about helping those who are trying to recover from alcohol addiction, not the sinful nature of drinking wine in general. Heck, some of the biggest winos I know are Methodist soccer moms.
     
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  15. mchammer

    mchammer 5,000+ Posts

    I am in no way in favor of prohibition. In fact my great uncle died after drinking bad liquor during prohibition. Did you know government purposely put bad liquor in the black market to give it a bad name? It’s possible that the US government killed my great uncle at the age of 21.

    With that said, drinking prior to prohibition was really bad. Without illicit drugs available, maybe it was no worse than today compared to drugs and alcohol combined, but the alcohol was more widely available than drugs and alcohol today.

    Prohibition was apparently the “coronavirus lock down” version of its day - way overboard to the danger.
     
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  16. Austin_Bill

    Austin_Bill 2,500+ Posts

    It was just the Irish, it's always the Irish. Thought English history would have taught you that.
     
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  17. Monahorns

    Monahorns 2,500+ Posts

    It was all the fault of the Post-Millennial Pietists of the North East who were descended from the Puritans. They secularized in the late 1800s/early 1900s and turned their attention from spiritual salvation to cleaning up society. Very moralistic but without the religion. They are still that way.
     
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  18. LongestHorn

    LongestHorn 2,500+ Posts

    Children of the Quarn

     
  19. Mr. Deez

    Mr. Deez 10,000+ Posts

    I get that. The temperance movement didn't come out if nowhere. People were abusing alcohol a lot. However, banning alcohol (like banning drugs) didn't alleviate the underlying problem. It only put the drinkers (moderate drinkers and the slobbering drunks) into a power struggle with government. It didn't go well for government.
     
  20. Monahorns

    Monahorns 2,500+ Posts

    So is the War on Drugs bad too?
     
  21. Mr. Deez

    Mr. Deez 10,000+ Posts

    For the most part, yes. It's largely ineffective, wastes money, and led to a massive increase in government power and weakening of individual rights.
     
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  22. Chop

    Chop 2,500+ Posts

    My understanding is that rye was pretty decent and prevalent prior to prohibition. Canadian whiskeys were also popular. Beer was more regional and even local. Speaking of which, here in Texas there was a culture clash during prohibition between many ‘Anglo-Americans’ (who were actually probably more Scottish and Irish In origin than true Anglo/English) on the one hand and Texans of German, Bohemian, and Mexican descent on the other hand. Many of the former bought into the prohibition propaganda. Most Germans, Czechs, and Tejanos would have none of that nonsense. Texas has a history of local control to deal with this sort of split. If you look at a county map of Texas dry counties, you can still see the split.
     
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  23. mchammer

    mchammer 5,000+ Posts

     
  24. Chop

    Chop 2,500+ Posts

    So I guess you spit micro droplets into the air when you sing, and probably when you talk. When you smell someone’s breath, you must be breathing in something...
     
  25. Horns11

    Horns11 5,000+ Posts

    Some music journal posted an article from several flu seasons ago that when a choir of 50 people sings for 5 minutes, it creates kind of an aerosol blanket that extends 37 feet in front of the choir and lingers for about 15-30 minutes before dissipation. So if you imagine a church congregation as the choir...

    I'll try to find the article.
     
  26. Austin_Bill

    Austin_Bill 2,500+ Posts

    I knew there was benefits to sitting in the back besides the fact that no one can see you sleeping.
     
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  27. 4th_floor

    4th_floor 1,000+ Posts

    I agree that we should all consider worshiping in smarter ways. I am currently attending services over the internet and my church has decided to make this ministry permanent. However, I disagree that traditional in-person worship should be made illegal. Who are you to dictate worship behavior?
     
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  28. mchammer

    mchammer 5,000+ Posts

    Our church is operating 25% capacity by seating every other pew, plus 6 ft between families in the same pew. Masks and hand sanitizer are required. Reservations are made online. Since starting about 4 weeks ago, I don’t believe we have had a service at full 25% capacity. Lots of people are voluntarily staying at home. Same for the office. We opened 2 weeks ago for those who wanted to come to the office and it’s been about 25% full.
     
  29. Monahorns

    Monahorns 2,500+ Posts

    It was also tied to what type of church you were a part of. Baptist and Methodist were more likely to be for prohibition. More high church, liturgical types were against it like Catholics, Lutherans, and some Presbyterians and Episcopals.
     
  30. Monahorns

    Monahorns 2,500+ Posts

    That is interesting and very believable. One thing I have read about is how improving ventilation and air flow systems could go a long way into making indoor gatherings less likely to spread infection. Would be good for any type of disease.

    Either just increase air flow or have fans to direct it. Even better have systems pull air out of the top and send out the roof and pull in from outside along the bottom.

    Makes me wonder about the German church. My speculation is that they had a long service with little to no air flow. The aerosol blanket just sat there over a long period of time.
     

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